Monday, January 18, 2016

C is for Cabin Fever

Ana muses on the benefits of winter.
Yesterday's high temperature was minus six degrees Fahrenheit. It was -24 at 8 p.m with a wind chill of -40. Alerts are being broadcast via radio, television, school, and Internet alerts: exposed skin will freeze (frost bite) within thirty minutes. Schools may start two hours late to protect underdressed children. (Think middle schoolers who'd don't want to miss a minute of pre-class social time and run  out of the house wearing indoor shoes). I talked to my employees on Friday about staying home rather than braving the cold.

This is life in Minnesota. It gets cold here in the winter. As long as the electricity stays on, I welcome it.

I can write without feeling guilty that I should be out weeding the garden.
There are no mosquitoes, deer flies or ants.
The freezer is full (thanks to the above).
Baking does not turn the house into an oven. It supplements the heaters. Ditto the clothes dryer, which adds welcome humidity. (I don't have to freeze dry washed clothes.)
The first cup of coffee in the morning warms my hands, cupping the mug, and my core.
No worries about sunburns that lead to "senior skin."
I never tire of soup.
Deer herd up in the woods and don't dart out of the brush to cross the road in front of our house as often.
Seed catalogs with glossy color pictures are fun-reads.
I have a reserve stash of boots and hats and gloves and scarves and coats. And a serious pair of OshKosh insulated coveralls.
We have someone who will plow our three driveways and the soup business parking lot.
Right now, we're gaining a minute of daylight each morning and and half a minute in the afternoon.
When spring comes in late April, early May, we truly appreciate it. Minnesota residents plant more flowers per capita than any other state.





11 comments:

  1. You make me feel like a total wimp when we complain of it 'being cold' here. We have no experience of such temperatures. It was interesting to read about a different experience of winter and was a lovely, positive post.

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    1. Where do you live, Carol?
      I have felt freezing cold in New York City. When the damp wind whips down streets.. BRRRR

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    2. I live in England. An hour or so's driving from Paula.

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  2. It's been cold here, too. But not quite that cold. The weather app on my phone right now says it's 1 with a windchill of -14 out!

    When it gets as cold as you're describing, school is usually canceled around here. In the last two years we've had 4 snow/cold days each year. So far none this year.

    Today is a holiday, so after brunch with a friend...we do it every year...you'll find me cuddled on the couch under a blankie with a book!

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    1. It's been really mild. We skipped a month of winter--unless Nature decides to tack it onto spring.

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  3. Okay, I think I actually want to go to Minnesota!

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    1. Come on up! The weather's..... normal.

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  4. As Carol has said, we have no experience of such low temperatures here, and so far we have had a very mild winter here- I've only had to de-ice my car windows once! I definitely couldn't cope with you Minnesota temperatures, or your snow either!

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    Replies
    1. Someone, somewhere is getting the cold. Siberia? Though the planet is warming.

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  5. Coming in late here as I was out all day yesterday. I couldn't possibly cope with your temperatures, Carol, although I suppose you do get used to it. We used to have long, cold, snowy spells when I was a child but nothing like that any more.

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  6. More proof the climate is changing!
    When we moved to Minnesota in January 1972, there was three feet of snow on the ground and it stayed subzero for weeks. We had four inches of snow last year. Two weeks of super cold temperatures. Species of trees are dying out. Fire danger first thing in the spring, before "green-up," is on red-alert.

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